SONG OF THE WEEK http://www.fozfan.com A site dedicated to David Foster Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:57:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 FLY AWAY http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/22/fly-away/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/22/fly-away/#comments Sun, 22 Feb 2015 19:51:49 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4852 [...]]]>  from FLY AWAY (single)

Written by David Foster, Carole Bayer Sager & Peter Allen

The late R&B/adult contemporary singer Stevie Woods enjoyed a brief stint of chart action in the early eighties after the release of his noteworthy debut album, “Take Me To Your Heaven.” The album was released in 1981 under the production of Jack White of Laura Branigan fame. “Take Me To Your Heaven” was a delicious collection of black-pop that showcased the warm timbre and excellent phrasing of the singer who was stylistically influenced by the incomparable Johnny Mathis.

Musically, the album followed in the footsteps of quality pop/R&B legends like Al Jarreau, Lionel Richie and Christopher Cross. With those influences in mind, White and Woods picked a string of catchy R&B/pop/adult contemporary compositions and put them in the hands of gifted arrangers Greg Mathieson, Gene Page and Jerry Hey. An impressive list of session aces including Nathan East, Mike Baird, Ed Greene, Steve Lukather, Ray Parker, Jr. and Paulinho Da Costa ensured a top-notch level on the instrumental tracks.

The debut single from “Take Me To Your Heaven” was “Steal The Night,” a catchy ballad that reached #25 on Billboard’s Hot 100, #36 on the R&B chart and #14 on the Adult Contemporary chart. The follow-up single was a refined, mid-tempo tune entitled “Just Can’t Win Them All.” This song was musically crafted in the best west coast vein and rightfully became another multi-format hit. The final single off the album was a beautiful cover of a classic Peter Allen/David Foster/Carole Bayer Sager composition “Fly Away.” Originally included on Allen’s 1980 “Bi-Coastal” record, “Fly Away” was an elegant ballad that quickly became one of Allen’s signature songs. Woods’ faithful rendition was based on a rich, sophisticated arrangement written by Mathieson with the embellishment of lush strings and horns courtesy of Jerry Hey. Those gentlemen provided the singer with the perfect back-up to deliver a superior vocal performance. The result was pure ear-candy and gave Woods another minor hit in 1982 by reaching #82 on Billboard’s Hot 100 and #23 on Adult Contemporary. “Take Me To Your Heaven” also included a gorgeous rendition of “Throw A Little Bit Of Love My Way,” a Foster/Graydon ballad that alone was worth the price of admission. “Take Me To Your Heaven” was one of those little-known, black-pop gems that’s a true delight to listen to from start to finish. If you like quality music, great songs, refined arrangements and top vocal and instrumental performances, give “Take Me To Your Heaven” a listen.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Stevie Woods
Keyboards: Greg Mathieson
Bass: Nathan East
Drums: Mike Baird
Guitar: Ray Parker, Jr., Steve Lukather, Paul Jackson, Jr.
Percussion: Paulinho Da Costa

Arranged by Greg Mathieson
Strings & Horns Arranged by Jerry Hey
Produced by Jack White


Lyrics

You’re an anchor, I’m a kite
You’re what gets me through the night
You keep me steady and on course
Until I found you, I was lost

But you’re the up, I’m the sky
And sometimes if I go too high
Then the pull the string
That pulls me back
If not for you, I might lose track

And I might fly away
Oh, I might fly away
And go my own way
To places that we’ve
Never been together

I might fly away
Take to the sky someday
But not for now, not today
Nobody here is flying away

Away

You have reasons, I have dreams
So we’re perfect, so it seems
You tell fortunes, I tell the truth
Kept me from my crazy youth

When you’re near me, I feel whole
I don’t have to rock and roll
I don’t worry, I don’t think
But, baby, hold me
Cause I might break

I just might fly away
Oh, I might fly away
And go my own way
To places that we’ve
Never been together

I might fly away
Take to the sky someday
But not for now, not today
Nobody here is flying
Flying away

Oh, I might fly away

I might fly away
But not for now, not today
Nobody here is flying
Oh, I might fly away

I might fly away
Take to the sky someday
But not for now…

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IF I TAKE YOU HOME TONIGHT http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/15/if-i-take-you-home-tonight/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/15/if-i-take-you-home-tonight/#comments Sat, 14 Feb 2015 23:33:13 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4844 [...]]]>  from WALLFLOWER

Written by Paul McCartney

Diana Krall can seduce with a sultry, soulful song or fascinate with an upbeat, playful melody. Hers is one of the most important names in the jazz world during the past twenty years. Born and bred in Canada , Ms. Krall has taken the music world by storm with her amazing alto voice and superior piano playing skills.

She first touched base with David Foster in 1999 when the super-producer crafted “Why Should I Care” for her and Krall performed that song on the soundtrack of Clint Eastwood’s movie “True Crime.” Then in 2001, the two Canadians would again cross paths when Foster co-wrote with his daughter Amy “I’ll Make It Up As I Go,” a beautiful composition that was included on the soundtrack of “The Score” starring Robert DeNiro and Edward Norton. Since the late nineties, Krall has been a Verve Records artist and with Foster’s recent appointment as the label’s president, a new collaboration was a sure bet.

Beginning of 2014, Krall was back in the studio for a new project overseen by Foster. The result saw the light of day just a couple of weeks ago with the release of “Wallflower.” The new cd gives listeners a little twist in sound as Krall embraces pop evergreens from the seventies and the eighties. This concept was warmly supported by Foster who is one of the best music producer around when it comes to handling quality pop music. He wrote a series of magnificent instrumental arrangements that crossed Krall’s classic jazzy style with a catchy pop approach. Foster enlisted world-class talents including William Ross, Chris Walden and Vince Mendoza to help him provide some spectacular orchestral scores. Krall also had Foster play acoustic piano on most of the record declaring “… I couldn’t play piano like that….he (Foster) put the songs in really difficult keys. Now I’m cursing him, because I’m thinking, how am I going to learn to play them in those keys?” Other giants appearing on “Wallflower” include the legendary drummer Jim Keltner, session aces Nathan East on bass, Ramon Stagnaro on acoustic guitar, Dean Parks and Michael Thompson on guitar and Christian McBride on acoustic bass. Standing out on top of it all is Krall’s gorgeous voice. The singer delivers a string of top-notch performances as her fabulous voice caresses listeners on song after song. Among the classics included here are staples like “California Dreaming” by Mamas & Papas, The Eagles’ “Desperado,” Sir Elton John’s “Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word,” “I’m Not In Love” by 10 cc and the Gilbert O’Sullivan hit, “Alone Again (Naturally),” a special duet with Canadian superstar Michael Bublè. Personal favs include another gem by The Eagles, “I Can’t Tell You Why,” delivered in a Brazilian-tinged arrangement and featuring a special guest vocal by writer Timothy B. Schmit. The Jim Croce classic “Operator (That’s Not The Way It Feels)” shows a respectful ear to the revered west coast sound of the late seventies. This tune highlights a special treat with the appearance of two vocal legends, Graham Nash and Stephen Stills who also plays electric guitar. Other highlights on “Wallflower” include a beautiful rendition with an evocative atmosphere of Crowded House’s “Don’t Dream It’s Over” and Carpenters 1971 hit “Superstar,” co-written by Leon Russell and Bonnie Bramlett that Foster reinvents as a bluesy torch song.

The “Song Of The Week” is “If I Take You Home Tonight.” This is a gorgeous original by Sir Paul McCartney and the only new song on “Wallflower.” Foster arranged it with William Ross and they enriched what is already a magnificent melody with the most perfect string arrangement. Krall’s vocals are sublime. She owns the ballad with an understated yet refined performance that’s a true work of art. The result is a modern-day classic that is set to become another evergreen of McCartney’s legendary songbook. The production is flawless and the sound immaculate thanks to Foster and his gifted partner in crime, Jochem van der Saag.

“Wallflower” is a welcome opportunity for music lovers to once again appreciate Krall’s talents. “Wallflower” is also a not-to-miss chance to experience a master class in record arrangement and production. This is not something you frequently find in today’s music world, but a sure bet when you read Foster’s name in the liner notes.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Diana Krall
Piano: David Foster
Guitars: Dean Parks
Drums: Jim Keltner
Bass: Nathan East
Programming & Sound Design: Jochem van der Saag
Orchestra Arranged by David Foster & William Ross

Produced & Arranged by David Foster
Co-Produced by Jochem van der Saag


Lyrics

If I take you home tonight
I will think of songs to sing to you
Music filled with joy and (light)?
If I take you home tonight

If I tell you how I feel
Would you be afraid and run away
I would say my love is real
If you let me take you home tonight

Oh my love let me treat you right
Let me take you home tonight

Oh my love let me treat you right
Let me take you home tonight

If you let me take your hand
There are places I could bring you to
In some unimagined land
If you let me take your hand

Oh my love let me treat you right
Let me take you home tonight

Oh my love let me treat you right
Let me take you home tonight

If I take you home tonight
I will think of songs to sing to you
Music filled with joy and light

If I take you home…
If I take you home…
If I take you home tonight

If I take you home…
If I take you home…
If I take you home tonight

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EVERY NIGHT http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/08/every-night/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/08/every-night/#comments Sun, 08 Feb 2015 17:36:49 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4836 [...]]]>  from MISS M

Written by Alan O’Day & Tatsuro Yamashita

The 1980 album “Miss M” from Japanese icon Mariya Takeuchi included the song “Every Night.” This soulful composition was co-written in the late seventies by deceased singer/songwriter Alan O’Day with Tatsuro Yamashita, a Japanese pop music icon and gifted songwriter/producer. Yamashita was married to pop singer Takeuchi who was a celebrity in her home country. Around 1980, Takeuchi recorded “Every Night” in Los Angeles with David Foster and Jay Graydon in the control room.

The enchanting ballad got the royal “Airplay” treatment and the result was outstanding. It takes only a few seconds of the song’s intro to be thrown into pop music’s most elegant territory. The subtle, irresistible groove of Toto’s original rhythm section with Jeff Porcaro on drums and David Hungate on bass matches Foster’s trademark keyboard playing and the classy embellishment of Graydon’s and Steve Lukather’s guitars. Greg Mathieson was another music genius who wrote the super-fine string and horn arrangements that were essential to enhance the level of sophistication on this zenith. Takeuchi does an acceptable job with her vocals though such a memorable musical scenario deserved a far more solid vocal performance.

Four other songs from “Miss M” were recorded in California with Graydon and Foster and showed stellar results. “Sweetest Music” and “Secret Love” were two shining gems from that project. “Sweetest Music” was a delicious pop/disco up-tempo co-written by David Lasley and the late, amazing Peter Allen. “Secret Love” was one of those Foster/Graydon masterpieces that you never tire of savouring, much like a fine wine. You can read a past review of “Secret Love” here.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Mariya Takeuchi
Bass: David Hungate
Drums: Jeff Porcaro
Guitars: Jay Graydon & Steve Lukather
All Keyboards: David Foster
Background Vocals: Alan O’Day, Laura Lee & Lori Kelly

Strings & Horns Arrangement: Greg Mathieson
Chorus Arrangement: Alan O’Day
Rhythm Arrangement by David Foster & Jay Graydon
Produced by Shigeki Miyata & Masaru Murakami


Lyrics

No Lyrics

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GOD BLESS THE HEARTACHES http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/01/god-bless-the-heartaches/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/02/01/god-bless-the-heartaches/#comments Sun, 01 Feb 2015 16:48:12 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4830 [...]]]>  from THE RISING PLACE

Written by David Foster, Conrad Pope & Linda Thompson

The connection between David Foster and the movie industry has been exceedingly tight and very successful. The Canadian hit-maker contributed great songs to an endless list of big budget films including “The Karate Kid Pt. 2,” “Forget Paris,” “Ghostbusters,” “Urban Cowboy,” “Message In A Bottle,” “The Mirror Has Two Faces,” “Sleepless In Seattle,” “Casper” and “The Bodyguard.” Foster also wrote the score and crafted all the songs for many hit movies including “St. Elmo’s Fire,” “Two Of A Kind,” “The Secret Of My Success,” “Stealing Home,” “One Good Cop” and “The Quest For Camelot.”

Some of the evergreens that were co-written and/or produced by Foster include Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me,” Whitney Houston’s “I Have Nothing” and “I Will Always Love You,” Peter Cetera’s “The Glory Of Love,” John Parr’s “St. Elmo’s Fire” and Andrea Bocelli’s “The Prayer.” The inclusion of those songs in various blockbusters brought Foster’s music to an even broader audience. Foster portrayed his superior knack for melody and his top-notch ability to craft pop music that assisted in raising the level of intensity of many pivotal movies scenes.

The vast majority of films, as previously noted, were top studio releases with big budgets and star-studded casts. One notable exception arrived in 2002. Foster and then-wife Linda Thompson co-wrote “God Bless The Heartaches” for a small, independent movie written and directed by Tom Rice titled “The Rising Place.” The collaboration came after Ms. Thompson saw an early screening of the film and wrote lyrics inspired by it. Foster then composed the music by adapting the love theme from the movie’s noteworthy instrumental score written by Conrad Pope. Thus was created a tender ballad with Foster’s trademark pop sensibility. “God Bless The Heartaches” was a beautiful, country-tinged ballad with a sweet melody and effective instrumental background. On top of Foster’s magic was the voice of Christian pop newcomer Kendall Payne. Payne is a Dove Award winning singer/songwriter who was at the first stages of her career. She has a crystal-clear voice and perfectly sang Thompson’s touching lyrics. “God Bless The Heartaches” was also recorded in a full country version that can be found at the end of the original soundtrack. A number of gospel-tinged songs are included in “The Rising Place” and are performed by Jennifer Holliday of “Dreamgirls” fame.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Kendall Payne
Acoustic Piano: David Foster

Arranged by Gary Stockdale

Produced by David Foster & Gary Stockdale


Lyrics

No Lyrics

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SATISFACTION http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/25/satisfaction/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/25/satisfaction/#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:18:27 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4824 [...]]]>  from RUNAWAY

Written by Bill Champlin & Richard Page

The years between the late seventies and early eighties often saw David Foster embedding dynamic and punchy horn arrangements into his productions. The Canadian Hitmaker’s close collaboration with arranger supreme Jerry Hey brought to life fantastic horn charts that can be appreciated on legendary recordings by Bill Champlin, Peter Allen, Boz Scaggs, Deniece Williams, Airplay, The Tubes and Average White Band. This week’s spotlight is put on “Satisfaction,” an irresistible, up-tempo jam that opened the second side of Champlin’s 1981 album “Runaway.”

“Satisfaction” was co-written by the Oakland-born singer/songwriter with his good friend Richard Page of Pages and Mr. Mister fame. It was a spectacular funky/pop tune that sports one of those aforementioned top-notch performances by the Jerry Hey Horns. The song’s sophisticated structure and soulful atmosphere had strong echoes of The Sons Of Champlin’s classic, r&b-influenced rock sound. Foster arranged “Satisfaction” with Champlin and they brought to life a sumptuous number charged with an irresistible, up-tempo beat and smart, jazzy changes to support the singer’s legendary baritone. On “Satisfaction,” Champlin offered one of his trademark, soul-drenched vocals and the overall result was one of the highlights of his long and remarkable career. Foster’s moog bass and John Robinson’s drums cemented the song’s foundation. Steve Lukather added some awesome rhythm guitar riffs and Hey’s superb horn arrangement was a key element here. Hey showed off his eight piece brass section and delivered some of the most powerful and impressive horn jams to ever be recorded on a pop record. Foster’s lush production, Champlin’s voice and those in-your-face horns were a foreshadowing of their imminent, successful work with the supergroup Chicago. Chicago would eventually decide to perform “Satisfaction” on their 1982 tour. This irresistible, funky number has been a steady offering on Champlin’s solo concert set-list for the past thirty years. A wonderful song and one that should be checked out.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Bill Champlin
Moog Bass, Fender Rhodes & Synthesizers: David Foster
Drums: John Robinson
Guitars: Steve Lukather
Percussion: Paul Lani
Trumpets: Jerry Hey, Gary Grant & Chuck Findley
Saxes: Kim Hutchcroft, Gary Herbig & Larry Williams
Trombones: Bill Reichenbach & Charlie Loper
Background Vocals: Bill Champlin & Richard Page

Arranged by David Foster & Bill Champlin
String Arrangement by David Foster
Horn Arrangement by Jerry Hey

Produced by David Foster


Lyrics

Yesterday and love was easy
Not a cloud up in the sky
Everyday you try to please me
One more tear falls from your eye
Oh, rainy day, won’t you go away
Leave it alone
Let’s get back where we started

Satisfaction
Is up to you and me
Satisfaction
Satisfaction
Is never guaranteed

Oh, I will never let you go
I just want to let you know
What you mean to me

Rainy day and we keep talkin’
Still we don’t know what to do
You keep sayin’ that you’re walkin’
You keep tellin’ me you’re through
Oh, rainy day, won’t you go away
Leave it alone
Let’s get back to where we started

Satisfaction
Is up to you and me
Satisfaction
Satisfaction
Is never guaranteed

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THAT’S THE WAY TO GO http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/18/thats-the-way-to-go/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/18/thats-the-way-to-go/#comments Sun, 18 Jan 2015 18:40:48 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4814 [...]]]>  from THAT’S THE WAY TO GO (single)

Written by David Foster, Jay Graydon & Jack Conrad

The Bottom Line’s “Crazy Dancin'” was one of the first disco albums developed in the United States around the mid-seventies. This project was the brainchild of well-known musician/songwriter Jack Conrad. He decided to bring to America the disco sounds that were so hot in Europe around those days. Conrad was renowned for writing and playing on albums for Three Dog Night, The Babys, Paul Williams, Kiki Dee and The Doors.

The sessions for “Crazy Dancin'” took place in 1974 LA with a line-up of young and gifted musicians including Conrad playing bass, David Foster twiddling on keyboards, Jay Graydon strumming guitar, Steve Forman thumping on percussion, Mike Baird beating the drums, Chuck Findley playing the trumpet and writing the horn arrangements, Jim Horn and Gary Herbig blowing the saxophones, Chas Higgens singing lead vocals and Ray Kennedy, Mentor Williams , Lee McElfresch “and anyone else foolish enough to be nearby the studio when voices were needed” on backing vocals. Other contributors included Bobby Findley, Dalton Smith, Slyde Hyde and Gary Grant. Foster and Graydon played a prominent role on the album by co-writing songs with Conrad and providing ideas for the elegant arrangements. The Bottom Line first released their sound in Europe that same year and was brought to the US and Japan in 1976 by Greedy Records.

The first single off the album was a collaboration between Foster, Graydon and Conrad entitled “That’s The Way To Go.” This song was a catchy dance anthem that sported an extremely sophisticated instrumental part that wasn’t easy to find on your typical disco tracks. Graydon’s trademark guitar with its gorgeous, melodic sound was the spotlight on this song. The track was backed up by a tight rhythm section and some powerful horns beautifully arranged by Findley. Higgens provided the soulful vocals to the song’s ear-candy refrain. “That’s The Way To Go” was the first 12 inch single ever released in the US. It became a minor hit on Billboard’s R&B chart at #85. This song and the whole “Crazy Dancin'” record showcased the amazing musicianship of Foster and Graydon at such an early stage of their careers. Their playing was already top-notch and beefed up the material with jazzy licks and superior performances.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Chas Higgens
Keyboards: David Foster
Guitar: Jay Graydon
Bass: Jack Conrad
Drums: Mike Baird
Percussion: Steve Forman
Trumpet & Horn Arrangement: Chuck Findley

Produced by Jack Conrad


Lyrics

No Lyrics

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HARD TO SAY GOODBYE, MY LOVE http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/11/hard-to-say-goodbye-my-love/ http://www.fozfan.com/2015/01/11/hard-to-say-goodbye-my-love/#comments Sun, 11 Jan 2015 16:59:37 +0000 http://www.fozfan.com/?p=4805 [...]]]>  from DREAMGIRLS

music by Henry Krieger Lyrics by Tom Eyen

In the early Eighties, “Dreamgirls” became one of the most successful Broadway shows in history. In 1982, the show was nominated for thirteen Tony Awards and won five. The huge popularity of the show saw the recording of an album that included material sung by its original performers. Geffen Records released the original cast album of “Dreamgirls” in the winter of 1982.

The album was also considered a big hit, reaching #11 on Billboard Top 200 and #4 on the R&B Album Chart, making “Dreamgirls” one of the most successful Broadway cast albums ever. The recording spawned two hit singles – “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” and “I’m Changing” – both sung by the show’s main vocal attraction, Jennifer Holliday. “Dreamgirls” would go on to collect two Grammys and was eventually certified gold.

Music mogul David Geffen declared that all this success happened because the album was cut as an actual record with a big budget and a talented producer like David Foster in the control room. While most Broadway cast albums were quickly assembled right after an opening, “Dreamgirls” took four months to complete. Foster’s perfectionism paid off with a series of stellar vocal and instrumental performances by the show’s singing stars and orchestra. Additionally, Foster ensured the sound’s quality to be top-notch by bringing on board his main collaborator and engineer supreme, Humberto Gatica.

Most of the recording had the show’s original arrangements by Harold Wheeler, but one song, “Hard To Say Goodbye, My Love,” was arranged for the album by Foster with his frequent partner in crime, Jerry Hey. Smoothly sung by Sheryl Lee Ralph, Loretta Devine and Deborah Burrell, “Hard To Say Goodbye, My Love” is a mid-tempo pop/soul number with a catchy beat and superb instrumental back-up. The tune transcends its Broadway origin and could easily belonged to any female r&b star of that era. It sports Foster’s thumbprints with great strings and keyboard work plus Hey’s trademark horn textures. Like the whole album, “Hard To Say Goodbye, My Love” was carefully crafted and perfectly delivered by Foster and the cast with impressive musical results. The Canadian super-producer made his first attempt at producing a Broadway cast album and the outcome was spectacular. Foster’s tremendous talent scored big in this new field and he helped create an album that was a point of reference in the industry for many subsequent years.


Listen


Lead Vocals: Sheryl Lee Ralph, Loretta Devine & Deborah Burrell
Keyboards: Myles Chase
Guitars: Andrew Schwartz & Peter Strode
Bass: Eluriel Tinker Barfield
Drums: Brian Brake
Percussion: Nick Cerrato

Arranged by Jerry Hey & David Foster

Produced by David Foster


Lyrics

Ladies and gentlemen in, their farewell performance the, incredible Dreams

We didn’t make forever We.
each got to go our separate way And,
now we’re standing here helpless, Looking,
for something to say We’ve.
been together a long time We.
never thought it would end We.
were always so close to each other You;
were always my friend And.

it’s hard to say good-bye my, love It’s.
hard to see you cry my, love Hard.
to open up that door When.
you’re not sure what you’re going for We.

didn’t want this to happen But,
we shouldn’t feel sad We.
had a good life together Just.
remember, remember, all, the times we had You.
know I’ll always love you, you
know I’ll always care And
know matter how far (far I may go) I may go In,
my heart you’ll, always be there (It’s

so hard) hard to say good-bye my, love (Baby.
it’s, so hard) hard to see you cry my, love (It’s.
so hard) hard to open up that door When,
you’re not sure what you’re going for (It’s.

so hard ).Good-bye
my love (Baby.
it’s, so hard ).We
didn’t make forever It’s.
so hard I.
can feel there’s something more (When.
you’re not sure what you’re going for ).We’ve
gotta grow We’ve,
gotta try Though,
it’s hard so, hard We
have to say good-bye Though
it’s hard so, hard We
have to say We
didn’t make forever But.
I will always love you We.
didn’t make forever But.
I will always love you It’s.
so hard Baby.
it’s so hard It’s
so hard Baby.
it’s so hard

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