May 182014
 

from LIVING WITHOUT YOUR LOVE
written by David Foster, Donny Gerrard & Eric Mercury

Dusty Springfield was a pop/soul singer from the UK who enjoyed terrific success in the late fifties up to the nineties. Exceptionally gifted with a soulful, husky voice, Ms. Springfield brought timeless songs to the charts including “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me,” “The Look Of Love,” “Son Of A Preacher Man, “The Windmills Of Your Mind” and “Wishin’ And Hopin’.” “What Have I Done To Deserve This?” was her 1987 collaboration with popular UK duo Pet Shop Boys and together they reached #2 on both the UK and the US Pop charts. Ms. Springfield prematurely died in 1999 and was rightly inducted in the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame later that year.

In 1979, Ms. Springfield released a good album entitled “Living Without Your Love.” It’s a consistent adult-pop collection close in style and atmosphere to other late seventies releases by songbirds like Barbra Streisand and Melissa Manchester. Produced by David Wolfert, “Living Without Your Love” presented material written by noted songwriters including Barry Gibb of The Bee Gees, Carole Bayer Sager, Bruce Roberts, Steve Dorff and David Foster. These adult contemporary melodies were perfect for Springfield and allowed her to shine with her voice oozing sophistication and class. The elegant instrumental back-up was courtesy of hot session cats like Jay Graydon, Ed Greene, Will Lee, Jay Winding and Tom Saviano. Among the best songs on the album are the smooth soul-influenced number “You Can Do It,” the emotional ballad “I’m Coming Home Again” originally sung by Gladys Knight and the Latin-tinged “Closet Man.” Co-written by Foster with his old Skylark colleague Donny Gerrard and singer/songwriter Eric Mercury, “Closet Man” was originally recorded in 1976 by Jaye P. Morgan with Foster in the control room. Musically, this song is very sophisticated with a wicked bass line, great groove and its arrangement has a delicious jazzy feeling enhanced by refined instrumental performances. As the title suggests, it is lyrically quite interesting and Dusty’s vocals are right on target. Take a listen to this little-known Foster goodie and enjoy the voice of a woman who was defined by Sir Elton John as “the best white British female singer of her time.”


Listen

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Lead Vocals: Dusty Springfield
Keyboards: Jay Winding & Neil Larsen
Synthesizer: Ian Underwood
Guitar: Jay Graydon & Dennis Budimir
Bass: Will Lee & Scott Edwards
Drums: Ed Greene
Percussion & Vibraphone: Gary Coleman
Backing Vocals: Dianne Brooks & Patti Brooks

Arranged by David Wolfert & Tom Saviano
Produced by David Wolfert


Lyrics

Your secret’s safe inside me

Closet man

Safe under lock and key

Understand

What you’re thinkin’ is important

Isn’t really so, you’ll see

But your secret’s absolutely safe with me

Your lover’s songs and nights
Turn into tears
Your tattoos and your muscles
Disappear
And the ring that I once gave you
Now, you’re wearin’ in your ear
But your secret’s absolutely safe my dear

Oh, your secret’s safe with me
Oh, your secret’s safe right here with me
Oh, your secret’s safe with me
Oh, your secret’s safe right here with me
You know, it’s all right to go on and live your life
So, come out into the light
Closet man

There’s nothing new at all under the sun
You’ve got company
You’re not the only one
Why, it’s older than religion
And, quite honestly, more fun
But your secret’s absolutely safe my dear, don’t worry

Oh, your secret’s safe with me
Oh, your secret’s safe right here with me
Oh, your secret’s safe with me
Oh, your secret’s safe right here with me
You know, it’s all right to go on and live your life
So, come out into the light
Closet man, yeah

You know, it’s all right to go on and live your life
So, come out into the light
Closet man
You know, it’s all right to go on and live your life
So, come out into the light
Closet man